SoS: Vegetable Review

Unlike the UK we’ve not had any rain other than the odd shower to quench the thirst of the scorched countryside. Unfortunately, this means we are on high alert for fires. Consequently, we try to conserve and reuse every drop of water when feasible.

So far my plants in pots are holding up well as they are watered at night via the irrigation system and the rest of the garden is watered with what we can reuse from the house/pool.

1. Yellow Peppers in Progress

I planted the seed plugs I bought from the market on 26th April. Three plants to a large pot – so far so good. I feed with Tomatorite.

Yellow Peppers in progress
Yellow Peppers in progress

**

Growing yellow peppers
Growing yellow peppers

2. Cucumbers Galore!

I also bought more cucumber plugs in April, which I encouraged to grow up a support rather than trail on the ground. So far so good and we now have a glut of cucumbers. Rather than let these go to waste I am researching various preserving methods. IF you have any tried and tested recipes please post in comments below or send me an email, please.

3. Tomatoes

When I bought these cherry tomato plugs the were meant to be a bush variety. They are growing in self-watering pots which means I only water ever two days. So far so good. The free-standing wigwam trellis was an afterthought.

Cherry Tomatoes growing in pots
Cherry Tomatoes growing in pots

OH decided he would grow his tomatoes in the Portuguese equivalent of a growmore bag.

Tomatoes growing in tomato compost bag
Tomatoes growing in tomato compost bag

This was the F1 hybrid blight resistant Koralik tomatoes I grew from seed. At £3.50 for about six seeds I am NOT impressed by these weedy specimens. They were planted undercover on the 18th April and nearly two months later  I am not impressed.

F1 Blight resistant tomato plants
F1 Blight resistant tomato plants

This Rosa tomato was planted as a seedling at the beginning of April. What causes leaf curl?

Tomato plants with leaf curl
Tomato plants with leaf curl

4. Nasturtiums for Salad

growing nasturtiums for salad
growing nasturtiums for salad

the above picture was taken on May 4th

I spent months naturing nasturtiums from seed then tending seedlings and potting on, only to be rewarded by these sickly specimens. I feel pig sick as the surplus seedlings I donated to friends are growing well.

so what went wrong?

Nasturtiums - too much water or not enough?
Nasturtiums – too much water or not enough?

5. Hungarian Hot Wax Chillie Peppers

Hungarian Hot Wax Chilli Pepper plant
Hungarian Hot Wax Chilli Pepper plant

 

Hungarian Hot Wax Chilli Peppers
Hungarian Hot Wax Chilli Peppers

The seeds were planted last November and potted on several times, so I am surprised they managed to survive for so long!  I am unfamiliar with this variety so have no idea as to to the heat of these peppers. I will probably just freeze or pickle them and wait until by daughter-in-law arrives as she loves these type of peppers.

6. A Minha Horta

Raised veg area
Raised veg area

The red and green cabbage continue to grow well as does the red onions. The cauliflowers run to seed and the peas succumbed to rust and thrips. Needless to say, the cauliflower was donated to the compost heap and the peas were disposed of.

I’ve just planted the Koralik tomato plants but I don’t hold out much hope.

At our next trip to the market, I will see if I can find some beetroot seedlings as we want to eat more fresh beetroot. However, I am tempted to just let the ground rest for several months before planting the winter crops and revamping the layout.

 

Raised vegetable garden
Raised vegetable garden

I need to change the design so I can reach all areas of the bed from the edge without climbing onto the bed itself. My mountain goat days are over.

In the foreground is my herb bed. Sheltering under the black crates are leaf celery seedlings, basil, lemon thyme, lemon grass and parsley.

***

The container-grown melons. lettuce, radish, spinach, physalis and strawberries are doing well. Salad crops we endeavour to replant every six weeks to ensure continuity of supply. which reminds me: better go and plant more radish seeds so we have organic radish when the family arrive for their annual holiday.

That’s it for this week. To catch up with more Six on Saturday bloggers why not click over to the Propagators Blog?

24 thoughts on “SoS: Vegetable Review

Add yours

  1. Annoying about the nasturtiums. The other day I was eyeing a snapdragon I gave my mother in law last year. It was a colour I didn’t have in my garden and I briefly pondered whether it was acceptable to ask for it back. I decided it wasn’t. I hope you get some rain soon.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. They do. The best self-seeded one is growing in a crack between the driveway and the side of the house. I’ve never tried collecting it.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. We think your tomato leaves are curling to protect themselves from the sun. Interesting blog. We have a garden in Portugal and are hoping that when we get back there next week we find our plants have survived the heat! Unfortunately we can’t grow anything which needs watering until we sell our UK house.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I had the same problem of ideas for cucumbers last year (and I only had 4 plants). This year I have 7 … I’ll have to be inventive! Fortunately my younger son (18 today) loves them! (a cucumber as a gift idea ?? !!).
    Your tomato stakes look very good. I saw the same in the “Garden of the tomato” (Chateau de la Bourdaisiere -https://www.labourdaisiere.com/portfolio/le-conservatoire-national-de-la-tomate/ – )
    If you go there one day, it’s wonderful and you can even taste some varieties.
    I have curl leaves too on some varieties (especially Andean tom ) … it doesn’t matter and it’s not a disease: thinner and narrower leaves that don’t like the warmth)

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I sort of suspect that the comments above about the warmth causing the tomato leaves to be narrow are correct; and I also suspect that this symptom might be enhanced by the warmth of the black vinyl cans that the tomatoes are growing in. The black vinyl collects heat if exposed to sunlight, particularly before the tomato plants grew big enough to shade them. Warmth may also have cooked the nasturtium, even though it is in much more comfortable and better insulated red clay pot. The clay pot is a good option for them, but their roots are more sensitive to warmth, especially if they get a bit dry.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Tony. Gardening is a constant challenge and we live to learn!

      I wonder if it would make any difference if I sprayed the black pots white so they reflect the sun rather than absorb it?

      Sadly the nasturtiums are brown bread (dead). I need to find a less exposed location for them.as they were not only subjected to full sun but strong winds! I thought they were a robust plant..but apparently not 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  5. It’s looking very productive there. We are washed out here with a flooded veg patch. My strawberries have been floating in the surface of the water. Tomato leaves curl to protect themselves from the heat and to conserve moisture. Less surface area exposed to the sun. It isn’t really a problem, but you could possibly put them under some shade material. If they are less stressed they will not so easily succumb to tomato diseases. Another reason they curl is if anyone in the area has used weed killer and it drifts on the air. Tomatoes are extremely sensitive to weed killer, even tiny amounts. Good luck with your garden. How wonderful to have a surplus of cucumbers. Mine haven’t thrived this year. Too cold and wet.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Karen… I feel so sorry for the UK gardeners. 😦 SO much rain it pales my challenges into insignificance.

      After reading all the comments, I am looking at ways to shade certain plants. I will set the OH a challenge 🙂

      We don’t use weedkiller (I will double check with the OH) as our garden area is all gravel or beds. I am unsure of our neighbour… but they have veg just over the otherside of the hedge so I can’t see they would. Interesting…

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Most things are doing so well, they look nice and healthy. I’ve had tomato leaves curl due to heat as well but it hasn’t affected the quantity or quality of the tomatoes produced. I hope you find the same with yours.

    Liked by 1 person

Please share your thoughts!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: