Unusual…

I am not sure if this is an unusual Rhubarb Forcer or an unusual use for a plant pot destined for the garbage after Mr Piglet burnt a hole in the bottom with red-hot ashes!

An unusual view!
An unusual view!

Researching on the Gardeners’ World website I’ve just realised I should have plugged any holes to exclude light.

Now there’s me thinking you at least needed limited light for plants to grow! OK Piglet back to the drawing board – there’s always next year! But then I’ve just read I should avoid forcing a single crown of rhubarb for two years in a row.

Rhubarb shoots peeping through the soil
Rhubarb shoots peeping through the soil

So come on folks get creative what else can I use this unusual pot for – any ideas?

Look outside the box - or should that be the pot?
Look outside the box - or should that be the pot?

I was going to transplant my much-loved Rhubarb to my raised vegetable garden (Piglet’s Plot) until I discovered the soil there is contaminated with white mold. There is certainly never a dull moment trying to grow fruit and veg!

Other unusual objects:
Old Feed Silo by enjoy Creating
Hurtled to 60 and now beyond – a unusal view of a potato or is it?
Mirth and Motivation – I love the unusual lighting!

This post was inspired by the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge This week’s them is, Unusual. What do you find “Unusual”?

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35 thoughts on “Unusual…

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  1. I’ve never really eaten rhubarb, that I know of, except my aunt used to make cookies with –no that was persimmons. I guess I never have. Do you eat much kale in Portugal? My mother practically lives on kale soup.

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  2. When I had a veg garden I would force the rhubarb under an upturned bucket every year. I would only remove it when the leaves started to lift it off the ground.
    Never seemed to do it any harm and I got plenty of rhubarb (although I’m not mad about the stuff).

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  3. Ola Piglet

    Maybe it needs to be more established. I was given a big clump when my brother-in-law divided his. He had that wonderful black soil that fell off the spade like sand, just like on the TV gardening programmes! I had solid yellow London clay so I wondered whether it would take. But it was fine after a few months.

    Don’t like the sound of the mould though – hard to imagine mould when you’ve had no rain for 6 months!

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  4. I like the mosaic idea. 🙂
    Have you added lots of organic stuff to the soil…when we had the big veggie and fruit garden in Connecticut, everything grew like crazy because the man who had owned the house before us for 40 years had truckloads of manure brought in originally and tilled it into the soil…so very rich…the fruits and veggies loved it. 🙂

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  5. Hi Viv,
    I love the idea of moasic. I have a rather tired and faded terracotta pot I’ve been wondering what to do with…so I’m going to try that.
    I bought some bags of manure when I filled up the raised bed. But this is a good reminder as I do need to feed the rhubarb as it needs to stay in the pot another year 😦

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  6. My parents grew rhubarb and asparagus in side beds . . . they came back year after year without much fuss or bother.

    I think you should make a hat out of the pot ~ that would be unique! 😉

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  7. It could be a nesting pot for something that nests? Or a latrine for some thing with a small bottom?

    I love rhubarb crumble with custard – not a stick of it in sight here in the tropics – enjoy!

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  8. Hey Pip
    Great photo and really curious pot you’ve got there. I guess you could grow mushrooms in it.Mushrooms can be a fun and healthy addition to your garden. 🙂

    I’m logged in through my main account and It looks like they got the form fixed for your blog. I hope this works like normal. ~fingers-crossed~

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    1. Hi EC, Mushrooms…now there’s an idea. I’ve never grown them…where do I start?

      Glad you got things fixed on your/my blog re comments. Poor Nancy was in the sin bin and we had to release her from SPAM!

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