Tag Archives: postaday2012

Piglet put the kettle on…

Piglet put the kettle on Piglet put the kettle on,
Piglet put the kettle on we all want some tea…

Except we won’t have some tea because the pigging thing won’t work.

Mr. Piglet has perfected the Portuguese shrug

Mr. Piglet has perfected the Portuguese shrug

A couple of months ago we had a problem with our kettle. Now in the grander scheme of things a dodgy kettle is not the end of the world. However, to me it’s very much a matter of principle when I buy a kettle or indeed any appliance and it breaks six months later. Yes, I know we live in a throwaway society but if something has a two-year guarantee I expect it to work for two years, not six months. Are you with me on this?

I did consider recycling the kettle as a plant pot to grow some herbs in. However,Mr. Piglet looked at me and laughed and was about to throw it away when I suddenly remembered we now file all receipts for occasions such as these. (This is not the first time this has happened).

Clutching the receipt and broken kettle we returned to the shop and Mr. Piglet presented it to the customer service assistant while I went off shopping. Mr Piglet returned with a wad of A4 size paperwork in return. Have they not heard of save a tree?

“Where’s the replacement kettle?” I asked as I stared with disbelief at the paperwork.

“They are going to send it off to be repaired,” he shrugged.

“What, it’s only worth nine euros; it will cost them more in effort, postage and admin.”

“How long is it going to take?”

Another shrug. Mr. Piglet has now acquired the perfect Portuguese shrug when he does not want to answer a question.

For people who’ve never witnessed the “shrug” the shoulders hunch towards the ears while the palms of the hands turn heavenward, no doubt hoping for divine intervention. The shrug is accompanied by a blank expression, a smile or a sigh depending on the nature of your complaint.

I grab the wad of paperwork and return to the customer service assistant. I know the girl can speak English so I did not even attempt Portuguese on this occasion.

“My husband’s just returned a broken kettle.” I said tapping my foot slightly with frustration. Not directed at her, but more with not having an immediate replacement.

“Yes.”

“Please can you tell me how long before we get a replacement?”

“A month.”

“A MONTH!” I said incredulously. Sometimes I can be quite scary. Probably hormones.

“Yes, a month.” She said tentatively.

“Why so long?” I asked, feeling more than slightly puzzled.

“Because we have to send it back to the technicians to be repaired.”

“But it’s going to cost you more than the kettles worth, that can’t be good business practice. You can plug the kettle in here if you don’t believe the kettle is broken”

My words fell on deaf ears and were met with the “shrug”.

At this point I’m wondering if it’s a ploy to get me to buy another kettle, I am losing the will to live and life’s too short. However, it’s a matter of principle. I stand my ground.

Another shrug “I’m sorry.” She says smiling apologetically which immediately calms me down and alleviates my frustration. Have you noticed a smile goes a long way?

“If you bring the kettle back within two weeks, we can replace it straight away; otherwise we have to send it away to be mended.” She explained patiently.

Six weeks later (that’s a Portuguese month) Mr. Piglet returns to collect the kettle. They can’t find the paperwork or our kettle.

Come back next week.

Two weeks later we return. The paperwork and kettle have gone AWOL so they give us a new kettle.

The moral of this story is: if you share the same ideals on a “throwaway” society don’t buy small electrical appliances miles from where you live in Portugal and keep the receipts for two years.

Does this sound familiar or is it just me?

Related posts
Livro de Reclamações
I Only Want My Oven Mended…please
Pigging Oven!

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Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables – October

Orange peppers are still growing in October!

Orange peppers are still growing in October!

Here we are hurtling towards the end of October enjoying the sun when autumn arrived quite suddenly. One minute we are swimming in the sea and enjoying temperatures of 25C while the cloudless blue sky suggested not a hint of rain and then it turned cold and wet…

I should have known better, our wedding anniversary was looming and it ALWAYS rains around that time. True to form ominous clouds gathered in a slate-grey sky and obliterated the sun. Howling winds alerted us just in time to batten down the hatches in preperation for the onslaught of rain which continued for two days and counting. When it rains in Portugal it rains! And as I write this it is still raining…

As the summer season ends and we move into autumn I dug up all the  tomatoes growing in pots and in my raised vegetable area.  There’s not much growing in Piglet’s Plot at the moment (as you can see from the pictures below) until I visit the market and buy whatever vegetable seed plugs are in season. I really want to plant some broad beans! (Favas)

Piglet's Plot mid October

Piglet’s Plot mid October

Piglet's Plot mid October

Piglet’s Plot mid October

At the end of September I bought two Couve Galega plugs (cabbage) from the market. The stallholder assured me this is the type of cabbage the Portuguese use for Caldo Verde (Cabbage soup).

Couve Galega

Couve Galega

Time will tell! They should grow really tall just like the ones pictured below.

Are these Couve Galega?

Are these Couve Galega?

Container grown fruit and vegetables

The experiment to grow potatoes in pots (prompted by a friend) proved to be a great success. I returned the pots on loan and found other suitable containers. Namely a potato bag designed for growing potatoes as pictured below and an abandoned and now re homed plastic paint tub. This is the true meaning of recycling!

Growing potatoes in bag

Growing potatoes in bag

I’m attempting to grow sweet potatoes. I planted these in large containers on the 18th September and so far so good, However, again time will tell. They weren’t seed potatoes but ones I rooted myself.

Sweet potatoes growing in pot

Sweet potatoes growing in pot

The lettuce plugs planted at the end of August are growing slowly, but at least they are still growing! The container is an old bowl which I drilled holes in for the drainage. It is perfect!

Lettuce growing in a recycled container

Lettuce growing in a recycled container

The cucumbers plugs planted at the end of August much to my surprise are growing well. Baby cucumber plants and parsley have self-seeded and are growing in the raised vegetable area.I always enjoy free plants – makes up for the ones the bugs eat! To help prevent white mould I’ve regularly sprayed the cucumber leaves with a solution of half milk and half water. Strange, but it seems to work.

Cucumbers growing in pots

Cucumbers growing in pots

Earlier this month I gave all my strawberry containers a good clean up. I cleared out all the dead leaves, potted up runners and gave all the plants a good feed. Two weeks later strawberries are beginning to appear!

Unfortuntely, some of the plants had mealybugs so I destroyed the infested plants and sterilised the containers. To be honest the old plants have produced so many runners I now have plenty of young strawberry plants. I never win the mealybug battle no matter what deterrents I use.

Strawberries growing in containers

Strawberries growing in containers

And finally!

Mr. Piglet very kindly constructed a simple frame for my tayberry and blackberry plants which I’m growing in very large containers. It is in a nice sheltered location in full sun. I can even put a net over the plants once they start to fruit to protect the fruit from the birds!

Tayberries and Blackberries growing in pots

Tayberries and Blackberries growing in pots

Until next month!

Related posts
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables – September
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in July
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in Containers – July
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in Pots – June
Problem Cucumbers – Is it Anthracnose, Downy Mildew or…?
Garden Diary: Container Gardening – Cochonilhas or Mealybugs?
How did I kill my tomato plants?
Global Warming and Zucchini
Growing fruit and vegetable in December

Is Bullfighting “Wrong”?

The theme for this week’s WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge is “Wrong”.

I often reflect on the heated and ongoing debate about the traditional spectacle of bullfighting which is popular in several countries including Spain and Portugal. While some people refer to bullfighting as an “Art” others refer to it as “Sport”. Either way should people inflict pain on an animal in the name of sport or art?

Is it wrong?

As we drove through Spain we saw the iconic silhouettes of the Osborne Bull erected in prominent locations such as on hillsides or on the vast desolate plains. I did not appreciate the size of the bulls until, inspecting this photo more closely, I spotted the people below!

The iconic silhouette of the Osborne Bull in Spain

The iconic silhouette of the Osborne Bull in Spain

Originally created as part of an advertising campaign to promote Veterano brandy the iconic bull has over time been adopted as the unofficial emblem of Spain and used on many touristy items. I wrongly assumed these bulls symbolised bullfighting, but fortunately they do not (thank you Mr. Google)!

What a magnificent animal so why “bullfighting”?

Please share your opinion either “for” or “against” in the comments section below. I would be grateful if you would also take a moment to vote in the poll – it will be interesting to measure my readers view.

Bullfighting in Portugal - Image from Wikipedia

Bullfighting in Portugal – Image from Wikipedia

Want to know more about bullfighting?
Check out Bullfighting on Wikipedia

Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in July

You certainly reap what you sow!

I’ve devoted hours tending my vegetable garden this month and I’m now reaping the benefits with an abundant crop of tomatoes, lettuce, radish, carrots, peppers, red cabbage and French green beans. The crops are fed at regular intervals with the MiracleGro kindly donated by a friend. However, I can’t seem to order this online for delivery to Portugal, nor can I seem to source from any of the garden centres or co ops.

Raised vegetable garden 22nd July 2012

Raised vegetable garden 22nd July 2012

The parsley is a bonus – it self-seeded!

The leeks planted at the end of May continue to thrive. However, because they were given to me as seedlings I planted more than needed so I hope they are not all ready for harvesting at the same time. The last batch I grew were left in the ground far to long and were woody and inedible. Mental note: next time, make some leek soup!

Raised vegetable garden 18th July 2012

Raised vegetable garden 18th July 2012

I am still struggling to eat the few remaining cabbages, both red and green. I’d love to freeze them, but our freezer is just too small! When we were away last year we had a power cut which tripped the electric and we lost all the contents of our freezer. “Fine, no problem”, we thought, until we discovered the insurance company refused to pay out for the spoiled food!

Green Beans, variety "Contender"

Green Beans, variety “Contender”

The green beans planted from seed on the 3/6 are now ready for harvesting…lots of beans! We not only eat them as a standard vegetable but are also one of the key ingredients in one of my favourite salads – Piglet’s Portuguese Salad

My first red pepper 22nd July 2012

My first red pepper 22nd July 2012

I transplanted several of the red and orange peppers growing in pots to the raised bed. The pots were unfortunatly not big enough and the plants were suffering. I also repotted the remaining plants to larger pots in order to continue my container gardening experiment.

Plum tomatoes 22nd July 2012

Plum tomatoes 22nd July 2012

The first fruit from the cordon plum tomatoes, planted as plugs at the beginning of May, are now finally turning red. I’m surprised at the length of time they’ve taken to ripen. The little cherry tomatoes, which are growing in pots, produced fruit and ripened quickly, so “cherries” seem a great option to kick-off the salad season.

Aubergine plants

Aubergine plants (Beringela)

The two aubergine plugs purchased from our local agricultural shop and planted on the 16/6 are growing well and are now covered in flowers. Looks like I may have a bumper crop of Aubergines. Thank goodness I only bought two plants!

I now need to grow a few more from seed or buy more plants. The little agricultural shop has now stopped selling plants through the heat of the summer months. I tried buying more lettuce plugs at the beginning of July, but now luck.

My baby lettuce are wilting in the heat and full sun

My baby lettuce are wilting in the heat and full sun

Unable to buy lettuce from our local shop I tried growing some from seed – would they germinate, not on your life! Faced with the prospect of paying inflated prices during the summer for lettuce, I managed to find plugs from a car boot sale. I could not believe my luck when I spotted a whole stall devoted to selling baby veg plants!

I only bought eight (four rosso and four green) However, in hindsight I wish I’d bought more as I’m now left with only one green and two rosso. Despite watering and planting late evening the tender baby lettuce have not fared well in the glare of the hot sun.

Note for next year: Plant baby lettuce in a more shaded place during the summer months.

Insect "burrowing" in leaves of orange tree

Insect “burrowing” in leaves of orange tree

The baby oranges on my solitary orange tree turned black, shrivelled and died. Some of the leaves are now infested with an insect that burrows its way through the leaf layers. I initially removed the affected leaves, but this did not resolve the problem as more appeared. I’m going to try one of the green pest deterrent potions suggested by Sami and Joan. Any idea what this insect is?

Food From Seed
Black Carrots
Joan’s black carrots seeds planted on the 5/6 have exceeded my expectations and are almost ready for harvesting. I’ve never eaten black carrots before so it will be an interesting experience. In fact, I’ve never seen a black carrot!
Radish
I continue to plant radish seeds at regular intervals to guarantee an ongoing supply. Rather than plant in regimented rows I now group in squares which works really well and conserves space.
Lettuce
Despite my best efforts I’m unable to persuade my lettuce seeds to germinate and resorted to buying more lettuce plugs from the market…
Green Beans (Contender)
Planted 3/6 and in just six weeks I have a bumper crop of beans.
30/7 Planted several seeds in a large pot as I need to rest an area of soil in the raised garden for a crop of broad beans which I will plant in October.

Related posts
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in June
How did I kill my tomato plants?
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in April
April: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in Pots
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in March
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in February
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in January
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in December

Weekly Photo Challenge: Inside (an old English pub)

The theme for this week’s WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge is “Inside”

In 2011, stranded in the UK due to the volcanic ash cloud we took the opportunity to visit many old towns and villages in the Cotswolds. Rather than taking their quaint charm for granted we viewed the architecture with fresh eyes and appreciated its character as tourists.

Inside
The picture below shows the inside of a typical English pub in the Cotswolds. As we entered the pub its interior felt cosy and welcoming, beckoning me to stay longer. I closed my eyes just a moment, and transported back in time I imagined sipping a good red wine on a cold winter’s evening. A roaring log fire burned in the hearth and mesmerised by the flames I felt warm inside. Memories such as these make me feel nostalgic for familiar surroundings.

Nowhere in Portugal, I have found, compares to the ambience of a typical old English Pub.

Inside an English Pub

Inside an English Pub

Outside

The Cotswold Arms, Burford - England

The Cotswold Arms, Burford – England

What places make you feel nostalgic?

Help needed please…

I love painting street scenes, however because I’m absolutely hopeless at drawing and especially “perspective” I needed to find a creative way to overcome my lack of talent. With this in mind I decided to cheat and with the aid of Photoshop created an outline picture from one of my favourite photographs which I could then print off and paint using water colours or acrylics. The only problem is I now can’t remember how I achieved this and I want to create more templates to paint!

After hours spent fiddling with Photoshop while cursing my stupidity as I tried various techniques, you can imagine my frustration.

So I’m appealing to all my followers and anyone who happens to drop by my blog out of curiosity…is there anyone out there in “CyberSpace” who is a “Photoshop Guru” who can help me or can anyone recommend a free photo management programme I can download which gives the same results?

Before

Now paint it!

Now paint it!

After

A side street in Lagos, Western Algarve

A sidestreet in Lagos, Western Algarve

If you would like to paint this picture you are more than welcome to use the photo and template.

UPDATE
YAY! I’ve done it! Thanks for everyones input and encouragement!
The link below provides easy to follow Photoshop tutorials just right for techno-muppets like me!
www.lunacore.com/photoshop/tutorials/tut011.htm

I followed most of the instructions. However, to lighten the picture for painting I used:
Image tab, then selected Adjustments then Brightness/Contrast

BEFORE

Colourful boats

Colourful boats

AFTER

I made the outline detail far lighter on this picture as I’m using it as a guide only.

Line drawing and ready to paint!

Line drawing and ready to paint!

Weekly Photo Challenge: Fleeting Moment

This post is inspired by the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge. This week’s theme is “Fleeting Moment”
Trying to take a photograph of this flower stand in a busy street in Lisbon, you can see what happened next!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

And in this case now you see them now you don’t!

Piglet meets up with fellow blogger Sami from Australia!

Sami, my blogging buddy from Western Australia

Sami, my blogging buddy from Western Australia

On Monday I met with one of my blogging buddies Sami of  “sami’s colourfulworld”. Sami lives in Perth, Western Australia and was in Portugal visiting family. When she suggested she delivered the prize I’d won on her 100th blog POST and GIVEAWAY in person, I was absolutely delighted!

My prize!

My prize!

It felt surreal to chat face-to-face rather than through the comment sections on our respective blogs, and great to  discover we had so many interests in common!

Thanks Sami 🙂

Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in June

Shame on me. I completely forgot to write my monthly vegetable diary for May and I only took one photograph of the raised vegetable area.

Raised vegetable garden 30th May 2012

Raised vegetable garden 30th May 2012

In my defence, I was away for several weeks so my garden was left very much to its own devices. Unfortunately this created problems with bugs and of course my container grown tomato plants

Another lesson learned is not to leave leeks in the ground too long as they run to seed, the centres become rock hard which then makes them inedible. All the leeks pictured above were recycled on the compost heap. “Waste not, want not” as they say…

Raised vegetable garden 23rd June 2012

Raised vegetable garden 23rd June 2012

Since returning to Portugal I’ve spent all my spare time in the garden and I’m finally reaping the rewards.

Plum cordon tomatoes

Plum cordon tomatoes

The cherry tomatoes bought from the local village shop look like plum tomatoes – strange I could have sworn I specifically asked for cherry! Another “lost in translation” frustration. I remember the guy saying they were cordon and “BOM?” as he smiled and nodded his head enthusiastically.

Orange Bell Pepper Plant

Orange Bell Pepper Plant

I transferred a couple of the orange bell pepper plants from their containers to the raised vegetable bed as the leaves were turning yellow and beginning to curl. I think the pots were probably too small and the plants were not getting enough nutrients. They certainly look much happier now. The next batch of peppers will be planted in much bigger containers!

However, I hope these are orange peppers and not green. After the tomato misunderstanding they could be anything.

French beans - variety, contender

French beans – variety, contender

French beans are really expensive here in Portugal so I planted a couple of rows of “Contender” This is a dwarf bush variety. I can’t grow anything up tall canes here on the coast as they would just blow away. I grew this variety last year and they were perfect.

Aubergine seedling planted 16th June

Aubergine seedling planted 16th June

I bought these Aubergine plugs for just 20 cents each from the local hardware shop. They were already in flower which I’m not sure was a good thing? They struggled for several days after planting, but now seem to be holding their own. The flowers are dying off and maybe, just maybe a baby aubergine will appear shortly. I decided against planting in containers on this occasion as there was room in the raised area.

I’m still pulling carrots planted from seed earlier in the year, and the green and red cabbage continue to do well.

Fruit

One of my Olive trees

One of my Olive trees

I discovered, one of my olive trees has lots of tiny olives. However, not so delighted to discover fluffy white bugs, possibly mealy bugs, have taken up residence!

My first orange tree

My first orange tree

This is my first attempt to grow an orange tree and so far, although the odds are stacked against success as they dislike salt winds, so far so good. This is a winter fruiting variety and already it has several tiny oranges. Fingers crossed!

Nespera tree

Nespera tree

The harvest from the Nespera tree was extremely disappointing this year with only six fruit. Someone kindly pointed out there were to many stems coming from the bottom of the tree and it resembled a buh, not a tree! After some drastic pruning we have our fingers crossed for a more successful harvest next year!

Food From Seed
5/6 Planted some of Joan’s black carrot seeds. I’ve never eaten black carrots before so it will be an interesting experience. In fact, I’ve never seen a black carrot!
7/6 Planted Mexcla Baby lettuce leaf seeds (Ensalada Asiatica) purchased from the Horticultural centre in Portimaõ.
11/6 planted spinach seeds

Related posts:
How did I kill my tomato plants?
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in April
April: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in Pots
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in March
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in February
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in January
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in December

The Forgotten Ones…

Several weeks ago you may recall I published a joke email about the treatment of The Elderly in Nursing Homes v Criminals in Prison. Guess who receives the best treatment! The post  resulted in one of my facebook subscribers posting a link on my Facebook wall: The Forgotten Ones: International Card Exchange for the Elderly. Curious, I clicked on the link which led me on to The Forgotten Ones: Compassion for the Elderly. The pictures haunted me…

The Forgotten Ones : International Card Exchange for the Elderly

The Forgotten Ones : International Card Exchange for the Elderly

Walk into any nursing home today, and you’ll see them: The aging lonely. They are easily recognizable. Look for the sadness on their faces, the pain in their eyes. With a television on for company, these men and women sit alone in their rooms. Their shelves are bare, their bulletin boards void of pictures, cards, or any memento denoting love from the outside. Those sad eyes may even hold a twinge of bitterness, asking, “Why am I still here with no one to love me?” ~ by Karrie Osborn

Intrigued by the idea I decided to contact Pam O’Halloran founder of “The Forgotten Ones:International Card Exchange for the Elderly”  and she kindly agreed to be interviewed.

Pam O'halloran

Pam O’halloran

Pam, please can you tell us a little about yourself?

I have been a flight attendant for many years with US Airways. My love and compassion for the elderly actually began on an airplane one day. An elderly gentleman boarded prior to the rest of the passengers, as he needed more time and help. He hobbled slowly down the aisle with his cane, as I carried his bag and lifted it into the overhead compartment. As he sat down, I began conversing with him, only to find that he was desperately alone in the world. He was headed to New York City alone, where he would then catch a bus to a place where he would again…be alone. When the plane landed, I walked with him up the jetway in an effort to get him some assistance to his bus. (nothing had been arranged for him previously and he had never been to NYC) He stopped after a few steps. I thought he was out of breath and asked if he was alright. He was weeping. He told me how much he appreciated my care and concern for him and thanked me profusely. I hugged him tightly and we cried together. I have never forgotten that poor, lonely old man. I never had any living grandparents, nor had I ever worked in elder care.

What prompted you to start The Forgotten Ones: International Card Exchange for the Elderly?

That man, on that day, touched my heart so deeply and inspired me to begin helping the lonely elderly however I could. I began volunteering and have been doing so in various capacities ever since. I can think of no better way to help them. The simple act of just being there, with love in your heart, makes a huge difference in the lives of the lonely and forgotten elderly…and your own,

What is “International Card Exchange for the Elderly”?

I began my original page, The Forgotten Ones: Compassion for the Elderly as a way to raise awareness and to encourage volunteerism. Many people indicated that they were disabled, homebound etc., and could not get out to volunteer. I always suggested sending cards.

Last October, I began, The Forgotten Ones: International Card Exchange for the Elderly with those people in mind, as well as others who may be too busy to volunteer. It is a list of long-term care facilities and other cooperating organizations that help the lonely elderly. People may choose one address, or many, from all over the world, and send cards, letters, postcards, photos, small gifts etc. to the lonely elderly who have no one. They often send several cards in a single larger envelope, with a note included that instructs the activities director to pass them to those residents who would most benefit from a little cheer.

I have begun sharing the list with those who request it so they may print and share it with others and their community. All of the addresses are on the page itself, however, one must scroll down quite far to be certain they view all the addresses. I have been thrilled with the feedback I have received. Many are involving their children, grandchildren, schools, churches, and even having “card party” nights with their friends to make and send cards to our lonely elderly. Wonderful!

How can people get involved?

Follow this link to connect to the page: The Forgotten Ones : International Card Exchange for the Elderly

Please don’t forget to “like” it!

It is very important, also, to click on and read the “About” to fully understand how to get started and glean a bit of information and ideas.

Anyone who would like the list and information to print and share may feel free to message me through the page itself and I will paste a copy to that message.

Please note – if you are not a member of Facebook you are welcome to contact Pam by email: pam o halloran [at] yahoo.com (Please remove spaces and change the at)

Do we need to contact care homes first to obtain permission to send gifts or cards?

I do have connections with some of the facilities and organizations listed, while others are submitted by people who ‘like’ the page and for various reasons would like a particular facility included. I have no way of knowing whether they have asked permission, but I have heard no complaints thus far. Residents names are never included, for safety, and the cards are addressed to the Activities Director to review first.

If one is able to contact and include the name of that individual, then even better. My experience has been that most people send cheerful little things that fit in a standard card envelope – like stickers etc. When sending gifts that do not fit in a card, I would suggest including a gift bag rather than actually wrapping them, to alleviate any safety concerns and allow the distributors to judge which gifts would be most appropriate and for whom. Larger gifts may always be delivered directly to a long-term care facility locally, and of course, an actual visit is always the best gift!

How and where do people add nursing/care home details to the list

Use the address listed on the facebook page or send by email.

If sending several cards in a larger envelope add “attention: activities director” to the outside of the envelope, and again, include a note inside stating your intentions to have them delivered to the more lonely residents. For individual cards, include the name and address of the facility along with “to any resident“, as well as “Attention:Activities Director” on the outside of the envelope. The greeting on the card inside can simply be a generic “Hello!” or any creative way of saying it.

I type and print a letter telling them a bit about myself, my life etc. and include a copy in each card. Photos of yourself, family, pets, travels, children’s drawings etc. are nice as well.

Postcards may be sent separately or included in a card. I like to encourage people to send cards outside of their own country or state/province if possible. It may make it more interesting and exciting for the resident. It can be as creative or simple as one wants to make it. I can assure you that your love and care will be felt and appreciated more than you can imagine!

Please also visit, The Forgotten Ones: Compassion for the Elderly and be inspired to volunteer for our lonely and forgotten ones.

Contact:
The Forgotten Ones: International Card Exchange for the Elderly
Compassion for the Elderly
http://facebook.com/pamohalloran1
http://pamohalloran.brandyourself.com
email: pam o halloran [at] yahoo.com (Please remove spaces and change the “at”

If this post strikes a chord with you, please reblog, share on Twitter, Facebook etc to help spread the word to your followers all over the world.

Thank you 🙂