Tag Archives: postaweek2012

Farófias com Leite Creme – À la Piglet

This traditional Portuguese recipe is courtesy of Fernanda

I’m always keen to try Portuguese recipes so when Fernanda kindly shared this recipe I thought I would experiment. I tried to discover what the word “Farófias” actually meant but unfortunately it did not translate. Any clues please?

I’ve never tasted Farófias before so my taste buds had no frame of reference to call on. However, I hope my attempt does Fernanda’s recipe justice and if not please try not to laugh as I am always open to suggestions.

Farófias com Leite Creme

Farófias com Leite Creme

Ingredients
4 eggs (separated)
1 litre milk
1 lemon
Cinnamon stick
Cinnamon powder
Farinha Maizena (corn flour)
Castor sugar to taste (about 3 teaspoons)

Method
Put in a saucepan around 7.5 dl (750ml) of milk with a cinnamon stick and a thin lemon peel, heat to boiling.

While you are waiting for the milk to come to the boil beat the egg whites (4 eggs) with a few drops of lemon. When firm, add 3 teaspoons of sugar and beat some more.

Remove the lemon peel and the cinnamon stick. Lower the heat and carefully place one or two tablespoons of the egg whites in the shape of a ball. I used two spoons.

Cook them by “playing” with the heat, letting the milk boil again so that’s easier to turn the egg whites until they are cooked.

Remove with a slotted spoon to a dish and transfer to dish.

P1070801(1)

When all the egg whites are cooked add the rest of the milk (total 1 litre), add some sugar heat but not boil. Add cornstarch (Farinha Maizena) to thicken if required. Add the egg yolks (NB make sure the milk does not boil otherwise the eggs will scramble. This happened to me and I had to start again).

Bring back to heat to thicken, do not boil and keep stirring.
Once it is ready, add to the bowl where the “farófias” are and sprinkle with cinnamon.

Mr Piglet is not too keen on cinnamon so as you can see I used sparingly.

Farófias com leite creme - Piglet style

Farófias com leite creme – Piglet style

PS, I was also tempted to take a photograph of my kitchen when I’d finished because Mr. Piglet reckoned I used every pot, pan, dish, spoon and utensil we owned! He was probably right…

Related posts
Portuguese recipes

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Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables – November

My passion for gardening has taken a back seat during November due to my trip to France, illness and of course the National Novel Writing 30 day challenge. However, much to my surprise everything, bar the cucumbers growing in pots, survived despite being unloved and neglected. Temperatures in the day hovered around 18C and 12C at night. So not cold, but it rained, oh boy did it rain!

The green peppers planted in the raised bed, continue to thrive and bear fruit! I will certainly plant these again next year although I will not bother with the orange peppers as they took far too long to change colour. The pot grown peppers are now passed their best and it will not be long before I finally find the time to recycle them in my new composter.

Green peppers in November

Green peppers in November

I planted garlic cloves as an experiment at the end of October in the raised bed rather than in pots. So far so good. My last attempt to grow garlic in pots a year or so ago proved unsuccessful. I think it was probably due to lack of water. Anyone had any success growing garlic in pots?…and if so please share your secret

Garlic - Alho

Garlic – Alho

The Couve Galega planted at the end of September have somehow escaped the attentions of the army of snails and caterpillars who have taken up residence in my absense. The Galega cabbage, I’m assured, is the tall cabbages seen growing everywhere here in the Algarve and are used to make Caldo Verde

Couve Galega - Cabbage

Couve Galega – Cabbage

The Aubergines planted in June are still bearing fruit.

Aubergine - Beringela

Aubergine – Beringela

This year I bought favas seeds (broad bean) from my local hardware shop. Forget buying the prepackaged seeds in posh packets at over €3.50 a go, mine were a real bargain at just 38 cents for the same quantity. I planted these on the 24th October and they are doing well. I’m personally not keen on broad beans but Mr. Piglet loves them.

Favas - Broad beans

Favas – Broad beans

The olive tree crop is disappointing as the olives are really small so not worth the effort in the pickling stakes. If anyone has any suggestions to encourage them to grow larger, please share!

My Olive Tree

My Olive Tree

Olives in December

Olives in December

GRowing Fruit and Vegetables in Pots

I planted these potatoes at the end of October in a plastic purpose made potato grow bag.

Growing potatoes in a plastic potato bag

Growing potatoes in a plastic potato bag

I planted these sweet potatoes in a large pot in the middle of September.  Maybe they will grow, may be not, but I thought it would be worth a try.  No idea how long they will take to grow so I will leave it until February before taking a peek.

Growing sweet potatoes in a pot

Growing sweet potatoes in a pot

Finally my winter strawberries! They are not huge but they are soooo sweet! My summer strawberries are busy producing lots of babies at the moment which I am in the process of rooting and potting on.

Winter strawberries growing in pots

Winter strawberries growing in pots

Related posts
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables – October
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables – September
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in July
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in Containers – July
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in Pots – June
Problem Cucumbers – Is it Anthracnose, Downy Mildew or…?
Garden Diary: Container Gardening – Cochonilhas or Mealybugs?
How did I kill my tomato plants?
Global Warming and Zucchini
Growing fruit and vegetable in December

A Visit to the Dentist – I’m SUCH a Coward!

A third molar.

A third molar. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A few weeks ago I broke one of my back molars on some crusty Portuguese bread. For the uninitiated the crusts are rock hard so lethal if you have crowns, false teeth or indeed any other form of dentistry!

Despite my aversion to dentists, the noise of the drill and that enormous needle they inject into your gums with such sadistic pleasure, I plucked up courage and went to the dentist’s reception and made an appointment. I’d never used this dentist surgery before, nor did I have a frame of reference from friends as to the quality of dental work or if they spoke English. So yes, I was extremely nervous!

Ho hum, decisions, decisions and as they say “beggars can’t be choosers”.

The broken tooth, one of my main munching molars meant I was unable to eat properly, and it hurt. A lot! Fortunately or unfortunately for me the receptionist indicated the dentist just had a cancellation. Before I could prevaricate she whisked me into the dentist’s chair and he had his fingers halfway down my throat while he muttered something in Portuguese.

“Abrer, ABRER” as he yanked my mouth open.

I grunted and pointed to my mouth as I choked on my saliva. I momentarily contemplated biting his fingers in retaliation. No this was not the answer Piglet so stop being such a coward.

“Abrer, ABRER!” he barked at me.
“OK Mr, it’s not my fault you have big hands and me a small mouth.” I thought as I lay gripping the arms of the chair in terror.

X-ray taken the receptionist and dentist joined forces to explain in pidgin English with the help of the x-ays that I needed a crown, but there was a problem. When is there not a problem in Portugal? NOTHING is ever easy and if it is, I’m immediately suspicious. The dentist gave me a temporary filling but I would have to return and have a mould made for the crown.

Was I in for a treat at my next appointment!

I sat in the chair and he immediately began to drill. I’m sure you can relate to that dreadful high pitch noise of the dreaded drill as you wait, eyes bulging in terror that the dentist will not inflict pain before the injection kicks in.

Hang on!

Panic immediately washed over me and I frantically waved my hands for him to stop.

“You’ve not given me an injection for the pain!” I wailed.

He looked at his assistant for clarification and then informed me “No nerves, root canal.” I felt stupid, but why the hell would I know I did not need an injection? The drilling continued. If I thought the drill was bad, having the impression made of my teeth using a metal plate filled with plasticky grunge was horrendous.

Once this metal clamp was inserted over my teeth I was not allowed to move. I could not even swallow my saliva, and when the grunge ran down the back of my throat I almost gagged.

Focus Piglet, FOCUS!

His assistant used a sucker to help alleviate the problem but only succeeded in exacerbating the situation by sucking up the underside of my tongue. OUuuucccccH I must have levitated six inches from the chair!

“Eshpeerar” He snapped, and then a little more kindly.

“Please do not move” and smiled reassuringly.

I counted to ten then twenty and then lost count in an effort to stay focused. Finally the plate was removed and another inserted metal plate for yet another impression. Much to my surprise I survived. Further explanations ensued, but by this time I’d lost the will to live and just nodded in agreement.

Unable to speak my imagination was in overdrive
“Shall we cut your head off?” “Yes, YES, anything just get this torture over with!”

Finally, treatment over I leapt from the chair, but before I could escape another appointment was needed to fit the crown. No they will telephone.

Three weeks later I’m back to the dentist ready and certainly not willing. More drilling and sucking. My tongue like a snake seemed to take on a life of its own and would not remain still. Finally the dentist stopped drilling in exasperation and held the evil drill in full view.

“I not want hurt your tongue.” he said pointing to the drill’s lethal attachment.

I lay motionless in terror, and even my wayward tongue finally remained still at the prospect of being amputated. Finally, the work complete I heaved a sigh of relief and vowed never to eat Portuguese bread again!

Creative Writing Course in the Algarve

Holiday Inn, Armação de Pêra

Holiday Inn, Armação de Pêra

The NaNoWriMo participants are now under “starters orders” as they eagerly await, or not, the first of November to arrive when the challenges begins. I am not feeling quite as apprehensive as I was thanks to the inspirational two-day residential Creative Writing course I’ve just attended at the Holiday Inn,  in the Algarve. The course, presented by Anne Aylor, gave me some much-needed self-belief and rekindled my flame of creativity. The other course members also proved a great source of inspiration as they shared their experiences and writing exercises with the class. Anne, as well as being an excellent teacher is also a great motivator and I will certainly be going again next year!

Both days were packed with a variety of timed creative writing exercises along with constructive feedback. To my surprise, I really enjoyed this and discovered a whole new approach to writing. My favourite exercise was  Stream of Conciousness. For this exercise we were given the opening sentence from which we created our own story in ten minutes. During this time we were expected to write without stopping, not make any alterations or even pause to read what we had written. Yes, it was tough, but once I cleared my mind and let the thoughts flow my pen raced across the page without effort.

This is the approach I will adopt for the NaNoWriMo. I’ve relived the novel’s plot and characters through my dreams and written copious notes so I will just write…

My only concern now is the time aspect because I’ve since been enlisted to look after my little granddaughter in France for a week in November. Perhaps she can learn to type and give me a hand!

Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables – October

Orange peppers are still growing in October!

Orange peppers are still growing in October!

Here we are hurtling towards the end of October enjoying the sun when autumn arrived quite suddenly. One minute we are swimming in the sea and enjoying temperatures of 25C while the cloudless blue sky suggested not a hint of rain and then it turned cold and wet…

I should have known better, our wedding anniversary was looming and it ALWAYS rains around that time. True to form ominous clouds gathered in a slate-grey sky and obliterated the sun. Howling winds alerted us just in time to batten down the hatches in preperation for the onslaught of rain which continued for two days and counting. When it rains in Portugal it rains! And as I write this it is still raining…

As the summer season ends and we move into autumn I dug up all the  tomatoes growing in pots and in my raised vegetable area.  There’s not much growing in Piglet’s Plot at the moment (as you can see from the pictures below) until I visit the market and buy whatever vegetable seed plugs are in season. I really want to plant some broad beans! (Favas)

Piglet's Plot mid October

Piglet’s Plot mid October

Piglet's Plot mid October

Piglet’s Plot mid October

At the end of September I bought two Couve Galega plugs (cabbage) from the market. The stallholder assured me this is the type of cabbage the Portuguese use for Caldo Verde (Cabbage soup).

Couve Galega

Couve Galega

Time will tell! They should grow really tall just like the ones pictured below.

Are these Couve Galega?

Are these Couve Galega?

Container grown fruit and vegetables

The experiment to grow potatoes in pots (prompted by a friend) proved to be a great success. I returned the pots on loan and found other suitable containers. Namely a potato bag designed for growing potatoes as pictured below and an abandoned and now re homed plastic paint tub. This is the true meaning of recycling!

Growing potatoes in bag

Growing potatoes in bag

I’m attempting to grow sweet potatoes. I planted these in large containers on the 18th September and so far so good, However, again time will tell. They weren’t seed potatoes but ones I rooted myself.

Sweet potatoes growing in pot

Sweet potatoes growing in pot

The lettuce plugs planted at the end of August are growing slowly, but at least they are still growing! The container is an old bowl which I drilled holes in for the drainage. It is perfect!

Lettuce growing in a recycled container

Lettuce growing in a recycled container

The cucumbers plugs planted at the end of August much to my surprise are growing well. Baby cucumber plants and parsley have self-seeded and are growing in the raised vegetable area.I always enjoy free plants – makes up for the ones the bugs eat! To help prevent white mould I’ve regularly sprayed the cucumber leaves with a solution of half milk and half water. Strange, but it seems to work.

Cucumbers growing in pots

Cucumbers growing in pots

Earlier this month I gave all my strawberry containers a good clean up. I cleared out all the dead leaves, potted up runners and gave all the plants a good feed. Two weeks later strawberries are beginning to appear!

Unfortuntely, some of the plants had mealybugs so I destroyed the infested plants and sterilised the containers. To be honest the old plants have produced so many runners I now have plenty of young strawberry plants. I never win the mealybug battle no matter what deterrents I use.

Strawberries growing in containers

Strawberries growing in containers

And finally!

Mr. Piglet very kindly constructed a simple frame for my tayberry and blackberry plants which I’m growing in very large containers. It is in a nice sheltered location in full sun. I can even put a net over the plants once they start to fruit to protect the fruit from the birds!

Tayberries and Blackberries growing in pots

Tayberries and Blackberries growing in pots

Until next month!

Related posts
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables – September
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in July
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in Containers – July
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in Pots – June
Problem Cucumbers – Is it Anthracnose, Downy Mildew or…?
Garden Diary: Container Gardening – Cochonilhas or Mealybugs?
How did I kill my tomato plants?
Global Warming and Zucchini
Growing fruit and vegetable in December

Is Social Media and the Latest Technology “Gizmo” Driving YOU Crazy?

When I bought my Blackberry, I thought about the 30-year business I ran with 1800 employees, all without a cell phone that plays music, takes videos, pictures and communicates with Facebook and Twitter.

I signed up under duress for Twitter and Facebook, so my seven kids, their spouses, 13 grand kids and 2 great grand kids could communicate with me in the modern way. I figured I could handle something as simple as Twitter with only 140 characters of space.

That was before one of my grandkids hooked me up for Tweeter, Tweetree, Twhirl, Twitterfon, Tweetie and Twittererific Tweetdeck, Twitpix and something that sends every message to my cell phone and every other program within the texting World.

My phone was beeping every three minutes with the details of everything except the bowel movements of the entire next generation.

I am not ready to live like this.

I keep my cell phone in the garage in my golf bag.

The kids bought me a GPS for my last birthday because they say I get lost every now and then going over to the grocery store or library. I keep that in a box under my tool bench with the Blue tooth [it’s red] phone I am supposed to use when I drive. I wore it once and was standing in line at Barnes and Noble talking to my wife and everyone in the nearest 50 yards was glaring at me. I had to take my hearing aid out to use it, and I got a little loud. I mean the GPS looked pretty smart on my dash-board, but the lady inside that gadget was the most annoying, rudest person I had run into in a long time.

Every 10 minutes, she would sarcastically say, “Re-calc-u-lating.” You would think that she could be nicer. It was like she could barely tolerate me. She would let go with a deep sigh and then tell me to make a U-turn at the next light. Then if I made a right turn instead.Well, it was not a good relationship.. When I get really lost now, I call my wife and tell her the name of the cross streets and while she is starting to develop the same tone as Gypsy, the GPS lady, at least she loves me.

To be perfectly frank, I am still trying to learn how to use the cordless phones in our house. We have had them for 4 years, but I still haven’t figured out how I can lose three phones all at once and have to run around digging under chair cushions and checking bathrooms and the dirty laundry baskets when the phone rings.

The world is just getting too complex for me. They even mess me up every time I go to the grocery store.

You would think they could settle on something themselves but this sudden “Paper or Plastic?” every time I check out just knocks me for a loop.

I bought some of those cloth reusable bags to avoid looking confused, but I never remember to take them with me. Now I toss it back to them. When they ask me, “Paper or Plastic?” I just say, “Doesn’t matter to me. I am bi-sacksual.” Then it’s their turn to stare at me with a blank look.

I was recently asked if I tweet. I answered, No, but I do fart a lot.”

A friend emailed the above words of wisdom and although a joke, the underlying message touched a nerve. What about modern technology and the various Social Media channels such as Facebook, Twitter, Klout, Pineterest, Google+ all wanting their pound of flesh and precious moments of your time, are they driving you mad or is it just me? In the end we end up going round in ever decreasing circles. That’s before we’ve tried to suss out how to operate the latest gizmo! I can’t even use my mobile phone properly and as for the remote control forget it!

And you thought this was going to be a serious discussion on the “ins and outs” of social media!

White insects in soil…what are they?

There is never a dull moment on Piglet’s Plot.  I’ve discovered yet another bug has taken up residence in my gourmet garden so I need some help from my gardening buddies please!

While emptying the soil from a pot I’d recently grown potatoes in I discovered tiny white insects running around in the soil. I’ve tried to identify them and think they may be soil termites or springtails. They are about 2/10th of an inch long and crawl very fast!

White insects with legs living in soil

White insects with legs living in soil

I cropped the photo and enlarged the image of the bug in question but the result is rather fuzzy!

White insects with legs living in soil

White insects with legs living in soil

On closer inspection today, I noticed they have a brownish head…tried to take more pictures, but no luck!

Has anyone, growing potatoes or indeed anything else in pots discovered these insects? I want to reuse the soil, but how do I get rid of them?

Update: I don’t know if it will work but I’ve submersed some of the soil containing the bugs in water. At the moment they are  threading water, so not sure if they can swim or not!

Further Update:
They’ve drowned 😦

Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables – September

August passed with a blink of an eye and before I realised, it was September. Unfortunately, I failed in my personal challenge to record my “August” gardening “ups and downs” along with photographic evidence. Fortunately I made some notes, which I’ve recorded below, but photographs are like hen’s teeth (non-existent)

A bug called citrus leaf miner attacked my lemon and lime trees so I attempted to treat with a spray consisting of
100ml (2 cups) of vegetable oil
25ml (1/2 cup) of washing up liquid

I then added 1 tablespoon of the above concoction to one litre of water and sprayed all the leaves once a week for four weeks.

Citrus leaf minor

Citrus leaf minor

The concoction proved unsuccessful and the leaf miner still rules supreme!

In fact, my garden is proving to be a real haven for all types of bugs and diseases and treating them is like trying to climb a greasy pole. Attempting to grow my own fruit and vegetables in containers and in my little raised vegetable area is proving to be quite a challenge and battle of wills. Thank goodness for my tenacious spirit!

The lettuce and corn salad seeds, planted in early August, despite my devoted attention to their needs failed to germinate. Bah humbug! Eventually I conceded defeat and purchased some lettuce plugs from the local market. My other purchases included a couple of sage plugs and cucmbers for 10cents each, and dare I say one zucchini. The stallholder laughed at my requests and I responded a Portuguese shrug and a smile. The poor guy has long since given up hope of selling me the normal minimum quantity of ten plants per variety.

On a positive note, my successes in August included: one orange and several red peppers, french beans, cucumbers, lettuce, cherry and plum tomatoes, chili peppers, lemons and some strawberries.

September
August merged seamlessly into September, the drought continued and the bugs, despite my best efforts continued to thrive and multiply.

The latest visitor to take up residence bored its way into several of the tomatoes, growing in pots. Once discovered I quickly disposed of these and then wished I’d cut open one of the tomatoes to discover who had moved in. I’m still none the wiser as to their identity – any clues please?

An insect bored into my tomato

An insect bored into my tomato

The cherry tomatoes, both in pots and in the raised bed yielded an abundance of sweet ripe tomatoes. However, the variety (breed unknown) shown here, just refused to ripen. I even placed banana skins close by, to encourage the ripening process. Well that was a waste of time as the banana skins eventually shrivelled to nothing and my tomatoes were still a yellowy-green. Patience is not always my strong point so I picked several pounds of the greenest tomatoes and made green tomato chutney. If it’s successful I will share the recipe at a later date.

Tomato jungle

Tomato jungle

On impulse I bought a packet of seeds labelled something like “mixed salad leaves” Yay! these did germinate and resulted in an interesting, if not strange tasting assortment of salad leaves to go with the lettuce.

Mixed salad leaves growing in a shallow container

Mixed salad leaves growing in a shallow container

The first crop of aubergines from the plugs I planted on the 16th of June are now ready for harvesting.

Beringela or aubergine

Beringela or aubergine

A quick snapshot of my raised veg garden below reminds me the parsley which self seeded survived the summer and continues to grow well. Why do seeds grow best where they self-seed?

Leeks, parsley and orange peppers

Leeks, parsley and orange peppers

The leeks planted in June have struggled for survival during the hot dry summer months. They’ve survived but they resemble oversized spring onions rather than leeks.

Strawberry runners

Strawberry runners

My strawberry supply ceased in early September and the established plants sent out runners which I potted up while they were still attached to the mother plant.

Potatoes grown in pots

Potatoes grown in pots

I planted potatoes in pots on the 24th of June and we harvested the first pot (enough for two servings) beginning of September. I felt really pleased with myself until I discovered that you should not plant potatoes and tomatoes near each other because they are both prone to blight. I later identified one of my potato plants had blight, which in turn spread to several of my tomato plants which then had to be destroyed.

Cucumber grows well in pots

Cucumber grows well in pots

I have a couple of pots of cucumbers and apart from battling with Downy Mildew or Anthracnose the cucumbers are delicious! Blogger, Growing Up in the Garden , suggested keeping downy mildew at bay with a 50/50 milk/water solution. Use a spray bottle to apply solution to the leaves, removing those that are too far gone. So far so good and it has definately helped.

I also planted a couple of baby cucumber plants in the hope I can continue to grow my own cucumbers in a sheltered position during the winter; we will see!

Overall considering August and September were so dry and hot they proved quite productive. However, next year I will not grow orange peppers as they take far too long to fruit and then turn orange.

Related posts
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in July
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in Containers – July
Portugal: Growing Fruit and Vegetables in Pots – June
Problem Cucumbers – Is it Anthracnose, Downy Mildew or…?
Garden Diary: Container Gardening – Cochonilhas or Mealybugs?
How did I kill my tomato plants?
Global Warming and Zucchini
Growing fruit and vegetable in December

Telling Porkies

When my son and fiancée moved to their new home in the UK they inherited a neglected, but nevertheless healthy rhubarb plant which had masses of thick juicy stalks. I was green with envy as the plant was growing in a small container and I’d desperately tried for years to grow rhubarb in containers, with little success.

Healthy rhubarb growing in a small container

Healthy rhubarb growing in a small container

Thinking of my ailing rhubarb plant in Portugal I jealously stared at it in disbelief; it defied EVERYTHING I’d been advised about growing rhubarb in containers – the container was too small, the soil was of poor quality and dry as a bone!

My sickly rhubarb in Portugal

My sickly rhubarb in Portugal

Why did this neglected plant look so healthy and my loved and nurtured plant, so sickly?

Healthy thick stalks of rhubarb!

Healthy thick stalks of rhubarb!

Six months later, while celebrating our grandson’s first birthday, I reminded our son he’d promised to cook me a rhubarb crumble.

True to his word he duly picked a bowl full of thick healthy rhubarb stalks and I left him in the kitchen to prepare the desert.

Rhubarb stalks ready for cooking

Rhubarb stalks ready for cooking

I asked him to take some photos once cooked, so I could share the recipe of his delicious creation on my blog. However, when I later questioned him in detail about the recipe he began to squirm, prevaricate and then admitted he’d cheated by using a prepacked crumble mix.

Cheats Rhubarb Crumble

Cheats Rhubarb Crumble

Prepacked crumble mix!

All the time we were eating he must have dreaded the moment of truth. He’d been telling his Mum *porkies.
*(Porkies is a version of cockney rhyming slang: Pork pies which rhymes with lies).

Please can someone share an easy crumble recipe so my son does not have to cheat…

BBQ’d Piglet on Market Day

Market day in Portugal is always an interesting and colourful experience...

Market day in Portugal is always an interesting and colourful experience…

Beginning to feel faint from the intense heat I paused in the shade of a large tree to people-watch. I smiled as tourists, oblivious to the scorching sun and their already lobster-red arms and faces, rummaged enthusiastically through the clothes stalls.

Brightly coloured tie-dye dresses and tops at just two for €15.00 were waved in tourists faces by sellers with eager smiles looking for a sale.

“Good price, you buy, you buy! Quinze eur-rosh. Muita Bonita.”

“Good price, Senhora, good price!”

I am not sure if the tourists eventually bought the clothes as a means of escape, or because they genuinely liked the unusual multi-coloured tie-dyed effect of the material. Either way, as I observed from a distance I was almost tempted to buy one of the fun dresses myself. That is, until I realized, the material was see through and I immediately lost interest. The outline of my posterior is definitely not sexy and would only detract from the dress so I smugly continued to observe proceedings from a safe distance as the tortured tourists parted with their money.

Serves me right for laughing – then the fun began!

My market “experience” continues over at Expat Focus. If you found my experience amusing please like, tweet and leave your comments there.