SoS: Yet Another Armchair Edition (January)

This week’s Six on Saturday will be brief. Photos are  limited as balancing on crutches and standing on one leg is not conducive for taking the best shots. My OH gives me a daily update re what’s happening in the areas of garden I can’t access at the moment. Apparently, he’s been busy weeding!

1. Red Cabbage

Red cabbage in January
Red cabbage in January

The Seedling plugs I planted on the 19th November are making steady progress. So far I’ve had them covered with crates to stop the birds eating the dreaded blue pellets or the dead slugs and snails. One thing’s for sure Portuguese snails are fussy and they won’t touch Superoc as I’d previously mentioned. A gardener friend has provided an alternative solution.

2. Sowing some seeds

Sensing my frustration, the OH set up a workbench on the patio table so I could at least plant up some seeds.

Planting up seeds
Planting up seeds

I have now started pots of basil, chives, rocket, early flowering petunias (festival assortment) and some flowers (Iberis Nana in Miscuglio) You may recognise from the photo.

The project also highlighted the fact I am desperate for some new mini-cloches (hint hint). OH bought them for me about 12 years ago for Christmas and the plastic has deteriorated in the sun. Even though I like to make-do and mend, the Gaffa tape is struggling to keep these together.

Mini Cloches
Mini Cloches

This will be their last season.

3. Rhubarb

My rhubarb (Timperley Early is peeping through. This is its second season so fingers crossed I will at least crop enough for a small rhubarb crumble.

Rhubarb - Timperley Early
Rhubarb – Timperley Early

4. Freesias

The recycled Freesia bulbs from last year planted on the 13th October are now in bud.

Freesias in bud - January
Freesias in bud – January

5. Gazanias

I have a love hate relationship with Gazanias. They bloom from December right the way through but come the hot weather their foliage resembles bird nests and make the garden bed look untidy. Every year I resolve to dig them up but then my resolve weakens as I remember their wonderful  colours during the winter months. They are meant to be drought tolerant but I seriously doubt that claim.

Gazanias in January
Gazanias in January

6. Views of my garden

On Monday we went to the local monthly market to buy red onion plugs, mixed lettuce and to see what else was on offer. You can imagine our surprise to find there was no market. We later discovered it had moved.

I leave you with some shots of my garden instead.

January 2019
January 2019

**

My garden, end Jan 2019
My garden, end Jan 2019

And finally another cacti in flower.

Cactus with pink flowers
Cactus with pink flowers

That’s it for this week.

Better late than never!

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16 thoughts on “SoS: Yet Another Armchair Edition (January)

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  1. The garden is looking great Carole. Hope all your plantings thrive and grow well. Haven’t had much luck with veggies here, either too hot or they get eaten by bugs.

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  2. The photos illustrate your dedications, Ms Piglet! Kudos.
    Gazanias are from my part of the world and I have grown a number from seed and have them dotted about all over the garden.
    The ones at our spot seem pretty drought tolerant, but they will go raggedy if not tended for a while.
    Odd thing I’ve noticed: The hens peck all over the garden and this includes in and around the Gazanias, some of which have reacted to this avian pruning by growing more dense and projecting their flowers higher than those left alone by the birds.
    Weird, but they look very healthy for the attention!

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