Six on Saturday: 09.01.21 Orchids and Garden Features

While daytime temperatures during the previous week were warm and sunny this week the sun has been replaced by mostly cloud and an icy wind driving temperatures down to as low as 9C. As well as the cold, we also have to contend with the humidity. Not the type of humidity usually associated with oppressive heat more a ‘dampness’ which seeps not only into the fabric of the house creating what is fondly known as the Algarve black mould on ceilings and walls, but it also penetrates into your skeletons so you are cold from the inside out.

This week for my six on saturday I decided to focus on my orchids and features that add further interest to the garden.

1. CYMBIDIUM ORCHIDS

Over the last couple of years, I have developed a passion for orchids. While I grow a couple indoors the suitable growing environment is limited so I have started to collect Cymbidiums which I grow outside under the terrace sheltered from icy winds and full sun.

Pink Cymbidium Orchid

My daughter bought me these two for my birthday in December

Yellow Cymbidium Orchid

This is the first cymbidium orchid I bought. An acquaintance and avid gardener was moving back to the UK so she decided, as the new owners of the house were not interested in gardening, she would sell all her potted plants. I’d never heard of cymbidium orchids and as it wasn’t in flower I was hesitant. This one started flowering in October and it is still flowering now!

White cymbidium orchid

2. FERN – SUN AND SHADE

I love this fern because it is so adaptable. It grows in sun or shade and is not too fussed about soil or neglect. I’ve no idea what it is called as it was a cutting from about 15 years ago. I am sure the Mother plant has long gone but her off-spring shoots live on.

Fern growing in a pot

This is a cutting I found this week growing in the gravel at the back of the vegetable garden. This fern sends out runners so this probably started life in a pot where the roots escaped into the gravel. It is now rehomed in a pot waiting to be transplanted to the Buddha waterfall rockery (see below)

3. BUDDHA WATERFALL ROCKERY

I’ve spent years deliberating and experimenting on which plants to grow in a raised area at the back of the waterfall. The latest, a spur of the moment purchase from a local nursery a creeping plant with purple flowers. Yep, the plant looks lovely close-up but when viewed from a distance, meh.

Budda stone statue
Buddha stone statue

A couple of years ago I introduced Buddha as a feature but I feel the rockery still lacks greenery aka contrast. The biggest problem is the light. In summer the feature is blessed with full sun and in the winter none at all. Ponderous. Then, inspiration struck! Why not grow one of the industrial ferns (see above) as it thrives almost anywhere? I’d already noticed some fern growing in the gravel so I pulled it up and repotted. Once the roots are established I will replant on the waterful rockery.

Budda

Hopefully, the lighter green fern will add an extra ‘something’. We will see.

4. FEATURE POTS

A great way to add interest or colour to the garden is to decorate pots and pebbles. This is the abstract mosaic project I completed this week.

Mosaic butterfly pot

and in position …

Abstract mosaic butterfly pot

and another

5. FEATURE PEBBLES

I finally finished the ghecko decorative mosaic pebble I started months ago. (well almost, he needs some eyes)

Ghecko  mosaic pebble

6. DECORATIVE SOLAR LIGHTS

I LOVE solar lights, especially the individual feature lights you can poke in pots or indeed anywhere you want to add evening interest or illuminate dark corners once it gets dark.

My Gnome bought me these as a little extra surprise Christmas gift.

dragonfly solar light
Hummingbird solar light
Butterfly solar light

At dusk

solar lights at dusk

at night they gradually change colour

solar lights
humming bird solar light

That’s it for this week, folks. Now I’m off to check out other gardening posts from around the world.

For more info on six on saturday check out Mr. P’s blog

33 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: 09.01.21 Orchids and Garden Features

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  1. Hi, the fern you show is called a “Ladder Fern” in New Zealand. It multiplies very quickly and can overwhelm other plants. So can be a nuisance but handy to fill gaps as long as you keep it restrained! Your orchids are beautiful. I have two in pots but they survive on neglect a bit. I have them under some trees and they’re yellow with a deep red centre. I’ll send you a photo if I can find one πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thankyou πŸ™‚ The ladder fern. That makes sense. You are right about it being invasive. The roots once escaped from a pot standing on the gravel by my veg patch and are now a constant source of plants for more pots. They also quickly outgrow their pots and if I don’t repot the ones in a plastic pots, they split the pots..

      Your orchids sound really pretty.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I really like your mosaic decorations. Are they easy to do? What do you use to stick them onto the pots or pebbles? I wouldn’t say no to a dip in your pool. I think ferns would look good there, they are so versatile aren’t they?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, they are relatively easy to do. It’s just having the right equipment.Glue, I just use normal glue if it is not for outside in the weather and TREX if it is going to be exposed to the elements. Yes, the fern is versatile, thank goodness! πŸ™‚ Yep, I am looking forward to May when I can swim again. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Although I am pleased that mine will bloom with two spikes, I would prefer it to be seen by others. It is outside of a window where we used to have our staff meetings in the mornings. Most of the crew has bee laid off, and the remainder no longer conducts staff meetings inside. When it starts to bloom, I may relocate it to where more people can see it.

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  3. You seem to have an ideal climate for growing cymbidiums which are the most-often-grown in orchid loving Australia. There are a huge variety in colour . . . . you may be able to buy small babies on line quite cheaply . . . they travel very well and grow quickly enough . On cooler, calmer days they appreciate an excursion into more sunny conditions . . . I adore all my yellows and oranges . . .

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I will have to look. The label on these says they come from the Netherlands.So yes, maybe worth finding out about babies in different colours. I haven’t seen orange ones so I’ll have to take a look.

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  4. That was a win, the first orchid you bought: the leap of faith was worth it. Your mosaics are very effective. What a lovely addition to the garden.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I know nothing about orchids except they are beautiful, now ferns on the other hand I can deal with! Ha Ha! I think ferns would be lovely and do well in the rockery! I will have to look for the individual solar lights as well! I like adding interesting props in the garden and these would be special! Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Beautiful orchids ! It was also one of my Six this weekend… And I love your decorated pots with mosaic.
    I had a dragonfly solar light like you. It was very pretty but it didn’t last long … Fingers crossed for yours.

    Liked by 1 person

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