SoS: Fruit and Veg

While I have taken a rest from writing about my garden and gardening in general due to visitors, my plants have laboured on left to the mercy under the watchful eye of the OH. The abundance of sea mist offered no compensation for the much-needed rain to deep water the shrubs and plants. Even the cacti and succulents are looking a little distressed and we’ve had a couple of casualties!

Herb Garden

One of my New Year’s resolutions was to revamp the herb garden. After several falsestarts, we  have (so far) more herbs alive than dead or dying. I still have a few such as dill, chocoalte mint and curly parsley to conquer but I will keep trying.

Herb garden
Herb garden
Herb garden August 2019
Herb garden August 2019

The normal mint decided it did not like the herb bed so took up residence in a strawberry tray which I cover with a plastic tray to offer shade from the full sun.

Mint growing in container
Mint growing in container

Kumquat trees grow well in pots

The Kumquat tree we planted in the SPring of 2018 continues to grow well but as yet none of the fruit has set. Note to self: spray to protect fom cirus leef miners.

Kumquat tree growing in a pot
Kumquat tree growing in a pot

Lime tree

This poor tree was doing well until the leaf miners took up residence. I need to remove the infected leaves by hand and then spray remaining leaves with diluted neem oil and washing up liquid.

Lime tree growing in container
Lime tree growing in a container

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Citrus leaf miner on lime tree
Citrus leaf miner on lime tree

Brussel Sprouts – Planning our Christmas dinner in August

We planted these in early July in the hope there will be some sporuts ready to pick by Christmas day. Last year I only planted three, this year we have fifteen plants so we can dabble in the Brussel sprout future’s market.

Brussels for Christmas
Brussels for Christmas

 

 

Tomatoes

We are so disappointed with these tomatoes. So say they are a blight resistent F1 hybrid variety. All I see is a sprawling mess with no central stem. At £3.50 for just six seeds I will not be repeating the experience next year.

Cherry tomatoes
Cherry tomatoes

These are the Cacho tomato variety we bought as seedlings from the market in July. Hopefully, they will provide tomatoes until Christmas.

Tomatoes for autumn and winter
Tomatoes for autumn and winter

Tayberry

I am told Tayberries are a cross between raspberries and blackberries. The stems are not covered in prickles and you eat them once they turn black. This was planted as a twig last year so, while we only have a few berries so far, I will be patient.

Tayberry
Tayberry

That’s my six for this Saturday. Check out Mr. P’s blog to catch up with more Six on Saturday bloggers

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11 thoughts on “SoS: Fruit and Veg

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  1. Good luck with your brussel sprouts. Your poor lime tree – there’s always something that will attack something. I hope it recovers.

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  2. I often have leafminers on my citrus leaves and every year it’s at this season (late summer) I remove the leaves and burn them. As I give them fertilizer twice a month, they produce many new leaves to renew the tree. Neem oil is also a solution.
      Is it a flower bud that I see on your photo of kumquat (top right)? Otherwise, interesting the tayberry … Did you buy it or did you cross it yourself ?

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    1. Hi Fred, unfortunately that is not a flower on the kumquat. Your comment has reminded me i need to fertilise to encourage new growth. What do you feed your trees? as for the tayberry, they are common here and I can plants either at the market or in most local garden centres. I also grow one in a pot…although saying that the roots have escaped into the ground

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Tayberry shrubs start to develop here and seeing you blog, it makes me want to try a purchase next year. About the fertilizer I use a special citrus liquid fertilizer ( 4-4-8 NPK + Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn…. ) every 2 weeks

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Oh, the dreaded citrus leaf miner. I was not aware that it was established there. It arrived here only a few years ago. It really bummed me out because citrus had always been so carefree here.

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  4. Well at least you have lots of tomatoes on your sprawling plants! Mine grew too tall for the supports and have collapsed upon themselves, but there is still a lot of fruit to ripen (and probably not a lot more heat!). I have found my mint – chocolate and a ginger – have done badly this year. Both suffered from rust as have many plants. I do hope that doesn’t occur next year.

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