Six on Saturday: Petunia Seeds, Poorly Plumbago and Curry etc.

Although we’ve had some spits and spots of rain this week it was not enough to water the garden which is becoming crisper day-by-day. Our water is metered so it’s always a good reminder to be frugal and use sparingly, or at least try and reuse shower and washing-up water. This week we set ourselves the challenge of recycling grey water from the washing machine. Who knew a washing machine, even on a quick wash, consumed so much water!

1.Abracadabra Rose

Abracadabra Rose
Abracadabra Rose

I planted this rose last year right before the temperatures shot up to over 40C. Poor little thing nearly died in the heat, so I am surprised it survived. Despite suffering from white mold, black spot, black fly, yellow leaves and a sundry of other ailments it seems to have bounced back!

Abracadabra Rose
Abracadabra Rose

 

2. Hydrangeas

We have a couple of hydrangeas which, fingers crossed, seem to be doing well.

Hydrangea growing in a pot
Hydrangea growing in a pot

the pot grown hydrangea, pictured above. I pruned right down to a few inches above soil level and let it rest over the winter. I then gave a good feed of slow release fertilizer in early spring and hey presto!

Hydrangea
Hydrangea

I pruned this within an inch of its life, covered the protruding stems with a good compost then fed in early spring.. I’d like to add some filings to change the colour to blue, but as yet I’ve not seen these sold in Portugal.

3. Curry plant – Helichrysum italicum

These grow wild here in the Western Algarve and this one took up residence in our garden of its own volition. Unfortunately, it’s grown quite leggy this year as I never got around to pruning it right back in January. Its fragrance – curry of course.

Curry plant - Helichrysum italicum
Curry plant – Helichrysum italicum

Poorly Plumbago

Passersby used to stop and take photos of this usually stunning specimen. Not anymore. It is dying and we don’t know why. I think it could be fungal so we sprayed it with a fungus spray. I was not happy, but it was either that or let it die. We will see. Any further suggestions as to the cause of its demise most welcome!

 

My plumbago is dying
My plumbago is dying

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Plumbago turning brown
Plumbago turning brown

 

5. Piggin’ Petunias

I was so happy to have grown all my petunias from seed this year until I saw the results. These are meant to be trailing petunias. The seed company should be prosecuted under the trade descriptions act. Maybe I planted them in the pots upside down.

Petunias
Petunias

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Petunias
Petunias

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Petunias
Petunias

 

And now they have started to die off due to a sticky covering which turns black causing the leaves to die.

Petunia leaves turning black and sticky
Petunia leaves turning black and sticky

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Sickly petunias
Sickly petunias

6. Agapanthus refuse to flower

White Agapanthus
White Agapanthus

My Agapanthus are on their final warning. Out of all these plants, only one has flowered.

Agapanthus won't flower
Agapanthus won’t flower

The plants are now about six years old so if these don’t perform next year and earn their keep, they will be rehomed.

Any suggestions, please?

That’s it for this week, folks. I am now off to check to see if any more lodgers have moved in.

Don’t forget to check out more Six on Saturday gardeners <Here>

16 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: Petunia Seeds, Poorly Plumbago and Curry etc.

Add yours

  1. Your Abracadabra Rose is gorgeous. I’ve never seen one before.
    Hydrangeas grow into huge bushes here in the mid south USA. I wonder if they would grow huge in Portugal?
    Helichrysum italicum is an interesting plant.
    I’m sad your Plumbago is dying. I hope you get it back healthy soon.
    Petunias are a whimsical flower. In the photos, your’s were pretty even though they didn’t trail. It’s sad they’re dying.
    I’m not familiar with the Agapanthus. I wish you the best after 6 years, you’ve given it a good chance. It’s a pretty plant though.
    I admire the time and heart you put into your gardening.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi EC. Yes, Hydrangeas can also grow huge in Portugal but because ours keep getting mildew and an assortment of other diseases we cut them back every year so it is always fresh growth.:(

      The Petunias, I am annoyed because I had hoped they would at least last the summer, but no. I need to go and buy more. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I can sympathise with your agapanthus woes. Last year ours flowered for the first time ever after being plonked in a pot. This year there’s no sign of buds at all, despite feeding. Lovely hydrangeas.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I comment late but I was very busy this weekend.
    I love the abracadabra rose ! About the plumbago, I can’t help you because it’s too cold to keep it in winter but I have family in the Basque country who has one and it’s beautiful (with the same weather conditions as you, maybe even more wet …) so fungal disease??? virus?
    Wait a little after your treatment and you’ll see…fingers crossed
    What about aphids on your petunias? That’s how mine died last year.. but I kept seeds and they boom right now

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, we are thinking fungal disease and OH has now removed all the dead and infect branches. We have now sprayed with a fungicide (which I am loathed to do). Yep the petunias have/had aphids and fungal. I’ve now pulled them all up and will start again. The flowers and form were not as described on the seed packet so not worth saving. 😦 I am annoyed because it took me months to nurture all those seeds to flowers.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I’m afraid I don’t like the Abracadbra rose – it is a little peculiar looking, but good on it for coming through all those diseases! I’m astonished that Hydrangeas grow in Portugal as they like loads of water. As for the Agapanthus I’d suggest getting them out of those pots and into the ground. They do become root bound and then don’t flower. Saying that I haven’t seen any spikes on mine this year though it did flower last summer. Maybe waiting for some heat! I think I’d bin those petunias…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think the rose is like marmite – you either love it or hate it. 🙂 The hydrangeas grow really well here providing they are well watered. I also grow the two I have in partial shade because of the heat. the agapanthus were in the ground and because they were not flowering I dug them up and put them in the pots… they are on final warning 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Even if I had more information about the plumbago, I probably could not diagnose the problem. The only problems that I had even encountered with them were bad gardeners and soil saturation, both of which you would already be aware of.
    The sticky black mess on the petunias sounds like sooty mold in honedew from aphid infestation. Have you not seen any aphid on them? Honeydew can be caused by whitefly or scale too. Regardless you should be able to see whomever is making the honeydew that is becoming infested with the sooty mold. I do not know what else it could be.
    The agapanthus may not be blooming because their roots get uncomfortably warm in those black vinyl cans. Although they enjoy warmth, they expect their roots to be insulated in the ground. They would be happier if they grew big enough to shade their cans, but may not be able to get big enough if they are not happy. They really like to be in the ground where they can disperse their roots. If you must contain them, their cans can be nestled into larger pots, or even into slightly larger black vinyl cans. They won’t care if the out can gets hot. (However, snails lie the space between the cans.)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Tony, on further investigation, the problem with the plumbago is a fungus infection and it’s now been cut back and sprayed .. fingers crossed it works!

      The agapanthus were in the ground for six years 🙂 Now they are on their way to agapanthus heaven.

      I

      Liked by 1 person

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