Six on Saturday: Succulents in Flower – December

My six for this Saturday will focus on succulents in flower this week. I have several more in bud but not in time to share on this post. Maybe they will hang on until January.

1. Cotyledon orbiculata Pig’s ears or Elk’s horn

This is one of the few succulents I have planted directly in the ground. The downside with this plant is scale insects love it.

Cotyledon orbiculata (Pig’s ears or Elk’s horn)
Cotyledon orbiculata Pig’s ears or Elk’s horn)

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Cotyledon orbiculata (Pig’s ears or Elk’s horn)
Cotyledon orbiculata (Pig’s ears or Elk’s horn)

https://www.thegardener.co.za/cotyledon-orbiculata-2/

2. Schlumbergera or Christmas cactus

I think most people have these as houseplants. I grow mine on the winterledge outside where they receive morning sun. This is their first winter so it will be interesting to see if they survive. Winter temperatures have been known to drop as low as 2C but hopefully the sheltered position will give them added protection.

Schlumbergera truncata
Schlumbergera truncata

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Schlumbergera truncata and S. × buckleyi Christmas Cactus 'Snowflake' Schlumbergera x buckleyi
Schlumbergera truncata and S. × buckleyi
Christmas Cactus ‘Snowflake’
Schlumbergera x buckleyi

3. Adenium Z (Desert Rose)

The Adenium Z, which I purchased at the Mediterranean Garden Fair in October,  is the latest addition to my succulent collection. As you can see, it still has the glossy dark green leaves that only garden centres seem to be able to maintain.

Adenium Z
Adenium Z

It is an unusual succulent in that it is deciduous.

https://plantcaretoday.com/desert-rose-plant-care.html

4. Kalanchoe Marmorata

I was originally attracted to Kalanchoe Marmorata due to its unusual leaves and it was one of the first succulents I bought. I never realised it flowered until now. This plant actually needs to be relocated as it is growing in the shade on the terrace.

Kalanchoe marmorata in flower
Kalanchoe marmorata in flower

https://worldofsucculents.com/kalanchoe-marmorata-penwiper-plant/

5. Crassula Capitella ‘Campfire’ (Campfire Crassula)

I bought this succulent from a little garden centre in Monchique way before I had any real interest in collecting different types. I have since taken cuttings from the original plant and leaf colour seems to depend on soil, sunlight and water. While this one is orange (lack of water) I have other plants which are rose pink and green. It is the most amazing plant and a worthwhile addition to any collection.

orange leaf succulent -genus unknown
orange leaf succulent -genus unknown

 

These are cuttings from the same plant growing in partial shade.

Crassula Capitella ‘Campfire’ (Campfire Crassula)
Crassula Capitella ‘Campfire’ (Campfire Crassula)

https://kumbulanursery.co.za/plants/crassula-capitella-campfire

6. Delosperma Cooperi (Ice Plant)

I love this succulent. It is easy to grow, take cuttings and gives winter colour.

Delosperma cooperi, Ice Plant
Delosperma cooperi, Ice Plant

This is the plant I asked the garden centre for the pink variety and was sold white. White does not quite give the same colourful glow in winter.

https://worldofsucculents.com/grow-care-purple-ice-plant-delosperma-cooperi/


That’s my Six for this week. Anyone else cacti or succulents?

Are you interested in gardening? Why not check out other gardening bloggers for their six on Saturday.

https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2018/12/15/six-on-saturday-15-12-2018/

Read other six on Saturday gardeners here

12 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: Succulents in Flower – December

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  1. I grow Cotyledon here, but the snails love it. The Delosperma is what we call ‘Pigface’ but I’ve no idea why, and I’ve done quite a bit of googling to see if I can find out with no luck. The others of your six, which are lovely, won’t survive the frost here.

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  2. There are so many iceplants to choose from! They are not as popular as they were back in the 1980s though. I remember seeing big squares of them in bloom on the hills of Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, where those who lived above had planted them to keep down combustible weeds. Some were bright purplish rose. Others were softer pink. There are shrubbier types that work nicely closer to the home. The only iceplant that I grow now is not really an iceplant at all, but is the common Carpobrotus chilensis.

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