Six on Saturday: Spring Flowers and a GM Bug

Another busy week in the garden. Sun, strong winds and showers kept me and the Gnome busy both inside and out. Lots more seeds planted and the cloches are full with pots of Hope and the construction of the raised vegetable beds are nearing completion. Over the weeks I have enjoyed photos shared by fellow gardening bloggers of Spring bulbs and flowers. Today I decided to share some of my favourites. Sorry, no Daffodils. I only had a couple of mini-jonquils which were quickly shredded by the wind.

1. Iris

These were inherited from a friend who bought several bags from the centre isles at Lidls … going cheap, cheap.

Iris

2. Freesia

I really love the array of colours and the wonderful scent they emit as you walk past. I have placed them strategically in pots all along my front terrace and entrance to the house.

freesia growing in pots
Freesia growing in pots
Freesia growing in pots
Freesias in March grow well in pots

3. Osteospermum

Never fails to bring a smile and brighten the borders with minimal attention.

Osteospermum
Osteospermum in March

4. Bottle Brush

It has a ‘posh’ name … but bottle brush is fine for now

Bottle brush in March
Brush in March

5. Delosperma (Ice Plant)

I love this plant! Don’t be tempted to try and grow in shady areas … it needs a lot of sun.

Delosperma - Ice Plant
Ice plant -Delosperma-yellow

6. An unwanted visitor

Friday, bending down tending to my seeds and seedlings I felt something watching me. I looked up very, very slowly and there he was, about 8-9 cm long about 50 cm from my face. Much to my surprise I did not let out a blood curdling scream, no. I backed away very carefully and run (well more like a hop-skip) and grabbed my moblile phone. I am still trying to identify the critter but it looks very similiar to one we had several years ago. Unfortunately, the battery on my proper camera was flat and the zoom on my mobile non-existent, so with shaky hands this is the best of a very bad batch of photos. BAttery now charged waiting for my next critter encounter.

That’s a wrap for this Six on Saturday, folks. The sun is shining so I am back in the garden to absorb some Vitamin D and finish painting wood for the raised beds. … and maybe plant some more seeds. You can NEVER have enough seedlings.

Enjoy gardening? Why not check out other gardens > Here

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20 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: Spring Flowers and a GM Bug

Add yours

  1. Freesias can really get around, and even if of limited colors, can revert to other colors along the way. The feral freesias that grow from seed are not as pretty, but are even more fragrant! It is not easy to be more fragrant than the original freesias.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Yours are not feral. They are too colorful. The feral freesias are a sort of pale yellowish white, with a lavender stripe. They are not as pretty as the real ‘white’ freesias, although more fragrant.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Isn’t the critter a grasshopper? I love hearing them, I might be less keen to have one close to my face. A very summery feel to your post, but you are in Portugal after all! What a stately iris, would never guess its Lidl origins 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think the freesias are also one of my favourites as well. Once they have finished flower, I feed again and let the foliage die down then stack the pots in a shady corner of the garden and let them dry out all summer. Basically, I just forget about them.

      Liked by 1 person

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