Piglet’s Plot in June

This year I’m keeping a photographic diary of my humble vegetable garden; what’s growing when, where and how well. Yes, I know it’s August and I’m writing about July June, but with recent trips to the UK and France I am way, WAY behind on my blogging activities. I took all the photographs, so at least I could backtrack and post at a later date.

Raised vegetable garden June 2013

Raised vegetable garden June 2013

The white onions planted on the 19/11/2012 are now ready for harvest while the red onions planted in January are not that far behind.

Red and white onions

Red and white onions

June Harvest

June Harvest

Growing Fruit and Vegetables in Containers

Tayberries - first flower and fruit

Tayberries – first flower and fruit

My experiment to grow tayberry and blackberry bushes in pots seems (fingers crossed) to be successful. They have produced many flowers which are now forming into fruit. (Toes crossed we get to eat them before the birds or insects)

Tayberry bush growing in pot

Blackberry bush growing in pot

Strawberries growing in containers

Strawberries growing in containers

The rhubarb is doing reasonably well. Not brilliant but it’s still clinging to life. Unfortunately, some white fluffy bugs, which I believe are the dreaded mealy bugs have taken up residence. The only thing I’ve found to kill these annoying little critters is diluted hydrogen peroxide 3% volume. However, I do not want to apply this concoction to something I plan to eat!

Rhubarb growing in pot

Rhubarb growing in pot

The groselhos bush I purchased last year at Lidls continues to thrive but as yet has not yielded any fruit. I think it’s a cross between a gooseberry and a raspberry. We will see.

Groselhos

Groselhos

Can you name these fruit bushes?

The following are stem cuttings I took last year from my daughter’s garden. One is a raspberry the other two are either blackcurrant, or blueberry.

Mystery fruit bushes

Mystery fruit bushes

Yay! I finally have two tiny limes. Despite removing all the leaves affected with the citrus vine weevil it has returned. Nothing seems to deter these tenacious little critters!

Lime tree growing in pot

Lime tree growing in pot

The cucumber plugs planted in March have a couple of healthy cucumbers ready for harvesting with more on the way.

Growing cucumbers in pots

Growing cucumbers in pots

In February I bought two aubergine (beringela) plugs. One I planted in the raised vegetable bed and the other in the pot pictured below. Only the plant in the pot survived and it is now bearing fruit!

Aubergine growing in pot

Aubergine growing in pot

The myestery plants courtesy of God, or the birds proved to be squash plants. There seems to be two varieties – well put it this way, the squash are two different shapes. I’ve never been successful growing squash in previous years so I’m naturally delighted by the gift. This variety must be Piglet proof, so I better remember to save some seed for next year!

squash plants growing in pot

squash plants growing in pot


Squash

Squash

What else am I growing?
Galega Cabbage: Thes cabbages are now over 1m (3′) tall. These are brilliant if you are limited for space. You remove the individual leaves as you need them and you are eventually left with what I can only describe as a cabbage tree!
Red cabbages:
Tomatoes: masses of cherry tomatoes. I was given other varieties but they did not survive or grew too leggy to grow in pots.
Yellow and red peppers: Flowers but no fruit
Raspberries: no fruit
3 peach trees: no fruit
Physalis: fruit, but unripe
Orange Tree: this now has two baby oranges which should be ready by Christmas
Fig tree: all the leaves turned yellow and then fell before turning brown. I was told it was either too much water or not enough. Don’t you just love that tidbit of advice?

Insects

My cabbages are plagued with cabbage white butterflies and then hundreds of squishy green caterpillars. I spray the cabbages with a weak solution of washing-up liquid and water, although over time I’ve manned up and now squish the caterpillars with my bare fingers.

Ants! We have five different types of ant. We’ve tried most branded treatments but none seem to work. I was once given a recipe for a homemade concoction which included a powder called borax. Unfortunately, after spending ages sourcing the borax I lost the recipe.

Related Posts

Piglet’s Plot in May
Recipe: Salada da Favas
Piglet’s Plot in February
Category Archives: Growing fruit and vegetables in Pots
Category Archives: Growing Fruit, Veg and Herbs

About these ads

25 responses to “Piglet’s Plot in June

  1. Bravo! for all that dedication! There’s nothing like fresh veggies and fruit from one’s own labour. :)

  2. Your harvest shot looks great . . . and that’s a nice looking butternut squash. Butternut squash is my favorite winter squash. Roasted and mashed with butter, salt, and pepper. YUMMY!

  3. How lovely! What a wonderful variety of produce!

    Our garden turned into a jungle over the past 5 days when we were out of town. I need to got out there and tame it.

  4. Congratulations on your lovely garden! My cherry tomatoes in a pot are very tall but not producing yet :(

  5. Despite all your ups and downs, your plot seems to be flourishing, and that is something to be proud of. It’s hard work, but worth it to taste home-grown veg and fruit straight from your own backyard. Well done!

  6. What’s a tayberry? The veggies look great and there’s no problem ingesting a tiny bit of hydrogen peroxide–it’s used as an oral debriding agent. Rinse off your veggies first and you should be fine.

  7. what a rich harvest. There’s so much work and so much joy in growing your own food. those white cabbage moths were the bane of my existence a few years ago. i read that if you can make and put up some pretend white moths they will leave the cabbages alone. Didn’t try it yet so can’t say for sure.

  8. Awesome harvest – we’ve had so much rain here in the U.S. South this summer, our garden is a wash. How tough are lime trees to grow? I’d love to have one.

    I don’t know if you can get them where you are, but a pile of grits on an ant pile will take care of that problem!

  9. Just had a thought about the cabbage butterfly and caterpillars – soak rhubarb leaves in water for a few weeks then spray the plants likely to be affected by the beasties with the “brew”. This will discourage them.

  10. I love your garden. I live in the far Northern tropics of Queensland, Australia. It is the first day of Spring here and I have a thriving young garden now. I probably should have planted earlier in our Winter, as our temps rarely drop below 15C.
    If you’re interested in my early efforts, have a look: http://invivamus.wordpress.com/

  11. Wow. I think the mystery fruit on the left of the screen is currant – black or red. We have red currant bushes at our farm in Virginia. Your garden is lovely. I’m totally impressed with what you can do in pots. I may try this next year.

  12. wow! that;s proper organic stuff… no travel miles there…

  13. Wonderful June harvest pic, PiP. Well done. You have green fingers indeed. :)

  14. FYI: Groselha is redcurrant in English, Ribes Rubrum species. :) Happy gardening!

Please share your thoughts!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s